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Combating the Spread of Fire Ants  

Source: Joe Collins, Kentucky Deputy State Entomologist 

We know that fire ants have been in the state since 2000. They have typically been an invasive species only in Western Kentucky; however, earlier this year, Kentuckians discovered them in the eastern part of the state. These ants can pose a risk to human, animal and crop health. While the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn’t currently list Kentucky as an “invaded” state, you should still know how to prevent, spot, report and treat fire ants in case you do encounter them. 

So far fire ants have been confirmed in southeastern counties like McCreary and Whitley counties along the Tennessee border, but the survey is ongoing to determine the boundaries of the infested area. If you are in or around an area where fire ants have been reported, it is important to report suspected fire ant mounds. Fire ants can spread to new areas of the state through the movement of certain agricultural products. For example, fire ants can infest round bales stored in the field or on the ground, so be wary in purchasing these types of bales. 

Fire ants are known for their mound-like nests. These nests vary in size but can be as large as 18 to 24 inches tall, and the mound has a fluffy soil appearance. You’ll typically find these mounds in open sunny areas on level ground or on a southern facing slope, and you won’t usually find them in wooded areas.

If you suspect fire ants on your property, do not approach the mound as fire ants are very aggressive and may sting if you disturb the mound. To report a mound, contact your local extension agent or submit a report to ReportAPest@uky.edu including a photo or video and address or GPS coordinates of the mound. 

If fire ants are identified on your property, you may use fire ant baits such as Advion, Amdro and Extinguish to eliminate the ants. Read and follow the directions on the product label. Do not use gasoline, diesel or other flammable products as a control tactic. 

For more information about fire ants, contact the Warren County office of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service. 

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.  

Equine: September Tips & Tidbits

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

“High Traffic Area Pads for Horses” ID-164

Some Early Thoughts On This Fall’s Soil Fertility Management

UK College of Agriculture, Food & Environment Corn & Soybean News (August 2022)

Dr. John Grove, Professor of Agronomy/Soils Research & Extension

SOIL TESTING for the next crop is important this fall. The summer season’s drought, after spring wetness (with compaction issues), is causing lower, more variable, corn and soybean yields. Lower grain yield means lower nutrient removal, but this is not perfectly predictable from a yield monitor. Drought affected grain is usually nutrient rich compared to rainy season grain. More corn acres will be harvested for silage rather than grain and nutrient removal is greater with silage. Soil test ‘problem’ fields/areas identified earlier this season. If you don’t do your own soil sampling, you might want to book sampling services early – this year there are more questions that need samples to inform deci-sion-making.

SOIL ACIDITY hurts root activity – a bigger problem in droughty seasons. Once soil test results are in, take a close look at soil pH. If needed, and if weather permits, lime should always be applied in the fall. Good quality lime takes time to dissolve and cause the carbonates to neutralize soil acidity.

DECIDING WHETHER TO APPLY fall nutrients, especially for corn and soybean, is more difficult this year. The decision generally depends on the target crop (wheat/forages vs. corn/soy); economics/value of fertilizer, time, and equipment; and the soil test value (low values mean higher recommended rates – better nutrient use efficiency when needy soils are fertilized to better match crop demand = spring for summer crops like corn and soybean). Fertilizer prices are lower (except for potash) now, but still high relative to prior years.

WHEAT follows corn in many areas. This year, most wheat will not need fall nitrogen (N). Lower corn yield causes less N removal. Tissue N will be higher in corn residues, giving greater N availability as residues decompose. Many grain producers have fields in forage production. Likely under fertilized this year, these crops/fields may really need some fall fertility to improve stand health, winterhardi-ness, and both forage quality and stand competitiveness with weeds next spring.

A WINTER COVER CROP can contribute. In addition to protecting against soil erosion (especially with less full-season soy residues this year), cover crops cause greater nutrient retention against fall-winter losses. One ton of rye dry matter (good stand, 12 to 18 inches tall) contains about 35 lb N, 45 lb K2O, and 10 lb P2O5. These nutrients won’t all be immediately available with rye termination next spring, but $32(N) + $33(K2O) + $7(P2O5) = $72 worth of nutrients, considering the most recent aver-age retail fertilizer price levels (https://www.dtnpf.com/agriculture/web/ag/crops/article/2022/08/02/summer-slump-retail-fertilizer), are retained.

FALL NUTRIENT SOURCE DECISIONS might also be difficult. This fall, the need for fertilizer N will be significantly lower. Fall application of N, regardless the nutrient source, will be less economical and losses are more likely, given likely greater fall background soil N levels. Nutrient sources containing N and other important nutrients (DAP, 18-46-0; MAP, 11-52-0; poultry litter) are usually priced consid-ering their N content, making them less desirable for fall application to wheat, corn, and soy acres this fall. DAP, 18-46-0, is a popular fertilizer P source and the most recent DTN survey average retail price (the URL just above) was $1005/ton. Urea, 46-0-0, was $836/ton ($0.909/lb N). This means that the 360 lb N in one ton of DAP was worth about $327, and the phosphate value was $678/ton DAP ($0.737/lb P2O5). About a third of the price of DAP is in the value of N it contains – N that is less likely to be needed this fall. You might ask your fertilizer retailer to bring in triple super phosphate (0-46-0) so that you can meet your fall phosphate needs without losing money on unnecessary N.

FERTILIZER PLACEMENT (banding) improves fertilizer P and K use efficiency, relative to broadcast fertilizer. AGR 1 (http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agcomm/pubs/agr/agr1/agr1.pdf) indicates that in spring, if soil test P and/or K are very low or low, one-third to one-half the recommended rates of P2O5 and/or K2O for corn can be used if it is banded 2 to 4 inches from the row. Relevant research for Kentucky soils is not available, but I’d estimate that precision (GPS guided) banding fall applied P and K would similarly improve their use efficiency relative to fall broadcast P and K. Precision fall banding would likely be superior to spring broadcasting, though not as good as spring banding, as long as corn is planted 2 to 4 inches from the banded P and K. Precision fall placement anticipates precision spring planting.

SBA Deadline Approaching for Working Capital Loans in Kentucky for Secretary of Agriculture Disaster Declaration for Tornadoes

Source: U.S. Small Business Administration

ATLANTA – The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is reminding small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture, and most private nonprofit organizations that Sept. 19 is the filing deadline for federal economic injury disaster loans in Kentucky resulting from Tornadoes on Dec. 10-11, 2021.

Low-interest disaster loans are available in the following counties: Allen, Barren, Butler, Edmonson, Grayson, Hart, Logan, Simpson and Warren in Kentucky.

Under this declaration, the SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program is available to eligible farm-related and nonfarm-related entities that suffered financial losses as a direct result of this disaster. Apart from aquaculture enterprises, SBA cannot provide disaster loans to agricultural producers, farmers, and ranchers.

The loan amount can be up to $2 million with interest rates of 2.83 percent for small businesses and 1.875 percent for private nonprofit organizations, with terms up to 30 years. The SBA determines eligibility based on the size of the applicant, type of activity and its financial resources. Loan amounts and terms are set by the SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition. These working capital loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable, and other bills that could have been paid had the disaster not occurred. The loans are not intended to replace lost sales or profits.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at DisasterLoanAssistance.sba.gov/ela/s/ and should apply under SBA declaration # 17321.

Disaster loan information and application forms may also be obtained by calling the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (if you are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability, please dial 7-1-1 to access telecommunications relay services), or by sending an email to DisasterCustomerService@sba.gov. Loan applications can be downloaded from the SBA’s website at sba.gov/disaster. Completed applications should be mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.

Submit completed loan applications to SBA no later than Sept. 19, 2022.

Feeding of Japanese Beetles on Soybean also Cause Injuries to Blooms

UK College of Agriculture, Food & Environment Corn & Soybean News (August 2022)

Dr. Raul Villanueva, Extension Entomologist

Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are native to Asia. This species was first detected in the early 1900s in New Jersey, but now occurs throughout many areas of the United States. This is a well-established pest in Kentucky.

Japanese beetles have only one generation per year. Its larval stage lives underground feeding on roots, with adults emerging in early-July through mid-September. The larval form of this carabid is called white grub.

Adult beetles are considered destructive pests of many ornamentals, turf, and landscape plants. In soy-bean fields, it has been observed feeding on leaf tissue between leaf veins; in many cases this feeding leaves a lace-like, skeletonized appearance. Figures 1A and 1B show initial feeding and advanced skele-tonized leaf, respectively. Leaf damage in soybeans can appear severe as leaves can be completely skel-etonized, and many beetles may be found aggregating on plants in a patchy distribution of the field. However, this injury seldom requires control measures.

At this time, I am reporting a not as well-known feeding habit of Japanese beetles in soybeans. I had heard that this insect was causing some damage to soybean blooms in the North Central region of the U.S. While conducting tallies for insects in soybeans, I observed that a couple of beetles were aggregat-ed under the foliage, and they were feeding on the blooms (Figure 2). Injury to soybean blooms may reduce pod development; however, studies to evaluate the impact of this feeding behavior have not yet been conducted. Feeding on flowers or fruit by Japanese beetles is typical for fruits or ornamental plants.

Late Season Weed Escapes

UK College of Agriculture, Food & Environment Corn & Soybean News (August 2022)

Dr. Travis Legleiter, Assistant Extension Professor & Jonathan Green, Extension Professor

Herbicide applications on full season soybean have been wrapped up on most acres for several
weeks now, and double crop applications will be wrapping up soon. Despite most herbicide application
being concluded, there are scattered fields with weeds such as waterhemp and Palmer amaranth poking
through the soybean canopy. Unfortunately, even with the most robust herbicide program a few escapes can occur, especially around field edges, planting skips, wheel tracks, and spots with underdeveloped soybean canopy. The questions that often occur is how to control these late escapes and what efforts are worth the cost to control these escapes.

What can I spray on escapes?
There is often the temptation to spray late season escapes in soybean, especially if escapes occur at
high densities. Although, the majority of postemergence soybean herbicides are not labeled for application either during or past the reproductive stages. Those without a reproductive stage restriction often have a restriction based on timing to harvest, most of which are labeled to be applied
no later than 45 to 70 days prior to harvest. We have already surpassed that date or are quickly approaching that time in most soybean fields. So, to answer the question, in most cases we unfortunately do not have products labeled for applications of herbicides this late in the season in soybean.
A few selected herbicide products that we often receive questions about for late season escapes are
listed in Table 1 along with the growth stage or pre-harvest applications restriction. A complete list
of soybean herbicide application timings can be found on page 100 of the 2022 Weed Control Guide
for Kentucky Grain Crops (AGR-6).

Outside of fact that most herbicide are not labeled to be applied this late in the season, the size of the
weed escapes is the other limiting factor. If you are seeing escapes in soybean at this time of year,
these plants are much too large to effectively control with postemergence herbicides. At best you
may stunt or suppress the escapes, but these plants are very likely to survive applications and potentially produce seed, if they have not already begun seed production. Additionally, within the list of
herbicides in Table 1 that you may still be able to be apply, many are PPO-inhibiting herbicides (i.e.
Cobra, Flexstar, Ultra Blazer, Phoenix). While it may be tempting to try to apply one of these herbicides to control late escapes of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp, it must be noted that many of our
pigweed populations are also resistant to the PPO-herbicides. Even if you do have a PPO-susceptible
population of Palmer amaranth or waterhemp, the plants are too large or mature at this time in the
season to be controlled by these herbicides. These PPO-inhibiting herbicides are only effective on
small pigweeds. Furthermore, some late season applications of PPO type herbicides such as Cobra
and Phoenix can cause severe leaf burn which could slow soybean growth and development as it recovers.


So what can be done on late season escapes of waterhemp and Palmer amaranth?
A primary goal for management of these two troublesome weeds is to reduce or eliminate new seed
production within infested fields. While this does not eliminate the current seed bank or keep seed
from moving into the field in the future, it is a large step in reducing the build of an unmanageable
seed bank.

If only a few escapes are occurring within scattered spots of the field or along the field edges, a few
hours of mechanically pulling plants and removing them from the field can go a long way. If you
choose to pull plants, you must remove the plants from the field as both waterhemp and Palmer
plants can re-root when simply laid back on the ground. Removal of even a couple of plants from a
field can go a long way considering a single plant can produce up to half a million seeds. This applies to plants that are growing just adjacent to your field as well, as these plants are also likely to
contribute to the seed bank within the field. The cooler temperatures that are forecast and ample
soil moisture in most of the state over the coming weeks will make for easier pulling of these plants.

In some cases, though, the number of escapes is too great to justify the labor to pull all the plants. In
these cases, your options really are limited. If the escapes happen to be a few dense pockets across
the field (too many weeds overall to hand pull, but only exist in a couple of areas or clumps within
the field), you may be wise to simple harvest around those pockets in the fall and sacrifice the soybean crop within those areas. Combines are a great source for spreading waterhemp and Palmer
seed. Any time you harvest through a patch of waterhemp or Palmer plants all of the biomass including seed is widely dispersed out the back end of the combine with the chaff, and is likely to be
transported to other fields. Harvesting around those pockets does not prevent the waterhemp and
Palmer seed from entering the seed bank, but it does help keep the weed seed localized to that spot;
whereas, a combine would spread that seed over the remainder of the field and onto others. If you
choose the option of harvesting around these pockets, make sure to note the locations for the coming years to possibly implement a more aggressive weed management program in those areas specifically.

Basic Rules to Follow for the First Spring Mowing  

Many homeowners dust off their mowers and start its engines early in the month of April to mark the first mowing of the spring season! Before taking off, follow a few of these basic rules when mowing to guarantee the best looking turf for the home lawn.  

Make sure that mower blades are sharp. A dull mower blade causes leaf bruising and tearing of the grass which results in a rugged appearance that favors turf diseases. Dull blades even increase fuel consumption and put wear on engine parts. Homeowners can sharpen the blades at a mower repair shop or with a few simple tools from the garage. All mower blades should be sharpened several times during the year.

Set the mower blade at the correct mowing height for the specific grass species that is grown in the home lawn. For a cool season tall fescue lawn, the ideal mowing height is between 2 inches to 3.5 inches tall. See table 1 below for optimum mowing heights recommended for Kentucky lawns according to turf type species being grown. Once the correct mowing height is set, this amount will also determine how often the lawn is mowed. For example, if the lawn is mowed at 3.5 inches, it may require mowing once a week. If the height is lowered, mowing will occur more frequently.

Remember to only remove one third of the leaf blade at one time. For example, if the desired mowing height is 2 inches, the lawn should be mowed when it reaches 3 inches tall. Removing more than one third of the leaf at one time leads to clumping of dead clippings which blocks sunlight to the living grass underneath. This lack of sunlight causes yellowing on the blades to the living grass and can result in plant death.

In spring, while the grass is actively growing, homeowners can lower the recommended mowing height to help remove the dead grass leaves. By removing this debris with low mowing, sunlight can reach the soil surface and encourage earlier growth in the grass. When disease pressure is increasingly higher in the summer, homeowners should raise their mowing heights. If different mowing heights are desired, it is recommended to reduce mowing heights gradually rather than in one mowing.

Table 1: Mowing Heights for Kentucky Lawns

Grass SpeciesOptimum Height (Inches)
Bermudagrass1.0–2.0
Kentucky Bluegrass2.0–3.5
Perennial Ryegrass1.5–2.5
Tall Fescue2.0–3.5
Zoysiagrass1.0–3.0

Kristin G. Hildabrand is the horticulture extension agent in Warren County, Kentucky. She loves helping clients answer horticulture questions and can be reached at kristin.goodin@uky.edu.

12-Point Checklist to Ensure your Planter is Ready for the Field

Authors: Simer Virk and Wes Porter

With the 2022 planting season officially underway, we will start seeing more row-crop planters rolling in the fields in next few weeks. For growers to have a successful and stress-free planting season, it is important to make sure that planters are well maintained and ready to go before heading to the field. When it comes to planting, preparation is the key as any breakdowns in the field due to planter malfunction or planting mistakes can cost growers both valuable time and money. We all know that timely and uniform stand establishment is important to maximize yield potential early in the season and one of the main factors that can affect crop stand is planter setup and operation as it influences where and how uniformly seeds are placed in the soil. Spending time on planter setup and preparation to get it field ready goes long way for growers as it not only helps minimize downtime in the field but a successful crop stand also sets the stage for rest of the season.

Before heading to the field, here is a 12-point checklist for growers to consider to make sure that your planter is well maintained and dialed in for peak performance during planting:

Parallel Linkages – Stand behind the row unit and wiggle it up and down and left and right to check for any play in the parallel arms, and adjust or replace linkages and bushings to make sure row units are secured nice and tight on the planter.

Drive System – Check all chains, idlers, sprockets and bushings, and replace any parts that are too worn. Make sure all drive chains are snug and do not have any unnecessary jump or vibration when operating. Lubricate all chains and sprockets before begin planting and regularly in the season. Additionally, check all drive system parts including flex drives, hydraulic drives and lines, and electrical drive systems including connectors and wires.

Tire Pressure – Check and maintain proper air pressure in the tires as recommended by the manufacturer based on the weight of the planter and planting conditions in the field. Independent of drive system, improper tire pressure can have negative effects on seed placement due to improper levelling of the planter toolbar.

Double Disc Openers – Check that the double disc openers are still sharp and within the diameter tolerance outlined by the manufacturer. Replace if they are dull or worn more than half an inch of their original diameter. Perform a quick check using a business card to ensure adequate contact (1.75 to 2 inches) between the disc openers at the 4 o’clock position.

Double Disc Openers – Check that the double disc openers are still sharp and within the diameter tolerance outlined by the manufacturer. Replace if they are dull or worn more than half an inch of their original diameter. Perform a quick check using a business card to ensure adequate contact (1.75 to 2 inches) between the disc openers at the 4 o’clock position.

Gauge Wheels – Inspect the gauge wheels for any cracks or wear. Adjust the gauge wheels so that they run tight against the disc openers but just enough so they can easily be turned by hand with slight pressure. Gauge wheels should also move freely up and down without sticking in any position.

Row Cleaners – Check row-cleaners for any wear and replace any bearings if they are not turning freely. Floating type row cleaners should also travel up and down to effectively clear soil/crop residue out of the way.

Seed Meters – Inspect each seed meter thoroughly for any wear or damaged parts including vacuum seals, brushes, scrapers, and doubles eliminator. Ensure that the correct crop kit (for newer meters) is installed in the meter. If not utilizing a seed monitor (capable of by-row feedback) during planting, it is also recommended to run the seed meters on a test stand to check performance and make any necessary adjustments.

Seed Tube – Check seed tubes for any cracks and wear at the bottom. Seed tubes should also be cleaned properly to clear any debris or obstructions (seed, cobweb, etc.). Make sure that the seed sensor is secured properly to the tube and working as intended.

Closing Wheels – Check that closing wheels are centered directly over the center of the row. Inspect closing wheels for any wear or play in the arms and replace parts or adjust as needed.

Vacuum – Inspect the whole vacuum system including hydraulic motor, fan and hoses for any wear, leaks or loose fittings. Check that vacuum hoses are attached properly to the manifold and to the seed meters on each row unit.

Downforce – For mechanical (spring type) systems, check all the components thoroughly and make sure different downforce adjustments can be made easily. For pneumatic or hydraulic systems, inspect all air or hydraulic connections carefully and perform a static diagnostic test to verify that the downforce system is functioning properly. This includes the compressor for air systems, in some cases it stays in the cab and can be neglected.

Technology – Check that the GPS receiver and planter display have the most recent firmware upgrades installed and are functioning properly. Check if the GPS correction subscription services and any other display unlocks for advanced planting features are activated and paid for rest of the season. Perform a thorough inspection of all technology components including sensors, harnesses, ECU’s and connections to ensure everything is connected and functioning properly. Also, make sure to back up planting data from the previous season on a computer or an external storage device before start recording this year’s data.

Keep in mind that once in the field, growers should get out of the tractor and check seed depth, placement and seed-to-soil contact during the first pass, and adjust planter settings as needed to optimize planter performance within each field. Also, check all of these parameters anytime field conditions change drastically, and especially when changing crops.

Congratulations to Warren County Cattlemen Kenneth Lowe for being inducted into the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Hall of Fame!

KCA Names 2022 Hall of Fame Inductees 

Five deserving cattlemen were honored during this year’s Evening Banquet at the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Annual Convention in Lexington, KY. Gary Woodall, Kenneth Lowe, Tom McGinnis, Charles Wills and Dr. David Williams were the association’s 2022 Hall of Fame inductees.

Gary Woodall has owned and managed commercial cattle since childhood but started Woodall Angus Farm in 1980.  It is a registered Angus seed stock operation selling over 100 bulls yearly across KY and the southeast.  Woodall has been active in his county association and has sponsored and hosted many agricultural field days and educational events on his farm.  He was KCA President in 2015 and has served on several committees during his time at the state level.  He was the 2015 Kentucky Angus Association Performance Breeder of the Year, 2008 Logan County Chamber of Commerce Farm Family of the Year, and 2010 Logan County Extension Service Outstanding Volunteer of the Year. Woodall was instrumental in the establishment of New Life Baptist Church and has served as an elder since its inception in 2005.  Gary is married to his wife, Aubrietta and they have 2 children and 5 grandchildren.

Kenneth Lowe has been operating a Purebred Angus operation, Oak Hollow Angus, in Warren County for 41 years.  He is a 7th generation cattle farmer.  He received his B.S. in Animal Science from Western Kentucky University.  He was President of the Warren County Cattlemen’s for 20 years and hosted multiple educational fields days for local, regional and state cattlemen.  He also hosted several University classes and livestock judging teams.  He was President of the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association in 1994 and worked on committees for NCBA and was on the Board of Directors for the Meat Export Federation. He has been awarded the American Angus Association Largest KY Angus breeder for several years, the Kentucky Seedstock Producer of the Year and the Kentucky Angus Association Performance Breeder of the Year. He has been married for 35 years to his wife Theresa and they have one son, Joe, who also works on the family farm.

Tom McGinnis raises Purebred Angus cattle in Shelby County.  Heritage Farm raised 200+ head of cattle and started in 1996.  Tom is an avid supporter of youth livestock projects and the Angus breed. He has been a buyer at the local youth livestock auction since it began in 1997.  He has been a sponsor of meals and activities for 4-H, cattlemen, Extension and other local agriculture organizations. He has also hosted several events at his farm including Great Meadows Angus Association sales. Tom served in the United State Army in Vietnam in 1967-68 and went on to receive his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Kentucky.  His kindness and generosity are huge assets in the Shelby County Community but he is very humble and finds joy in the success of others over himself.  He is married to his wife, Pam and has two children and 3 grandchildren.

Region 4 winner Charles Wills purchased a 155 acre farm from his grandfather in 1960.  He later added acreage and started cattle farming in the early 1970’s.  He became a premier backgrounder of heifers.  He always opened up his farm to novices and those interested in getting in the cattle business. He is a charter member of the Montgomery County Cattlemen’s Association and served for 2 years as President.  He was instrumental in recruiting and retaining over 650 members annually.  He served as a Second Lieutenant in the Air Force and was promoted to Captain during the Korean Conflict.  He returned and was a teacher and principal for 36 years.  Mr. Wills still runs his cattle operation with the help of his two grandsons, is a respected member of his community and is active in his church.  He was married to his wife for 62 years and has two children and 3 grandchildren.

Dr. David Williams is the Owner/President of Burkmann Industries, Inc, that owns and operates 13 animal feed manufacturing plants and 17 retail locations throughout Kentucky and Tennessee. He also owns Forever Spring Farm in Danville, KY.  Dr. Williams has provided Kentucky farmers nutritional support and feed products for over 42 years.  He has served in numerous positions over the years, including Kentucky Cattlemen’s Foundation Chairman, Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Treasurer, and a member of the Kentucky State Fair Board.  He has spent the last 47 years supporting and being a resource to Kentucky farm families.  He began his career in the Kentucky Extension Service and his passion for agriculture education has continued throughout his career.  He has been very active in the Boyle County community sitting on Boards and donating to programs like the Backpacks for Kids program. He is very active in his church serving as Deacon, Treasurer and Sunday school teacher.  His advice and mentorship to so many in the state is second to none.  He received his B.S and M.S. in Animal Science from the University of Kentucky and his Ph.D from Iowa State University in Animal Nutrition.  He has been married to his wife, Betty-Gayle for 53 years and has two children and 4 grandchildren.

The Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association would like to congratulate all of these deserving individuals for their years of service and numerous contributions to the agriculture industry. Videos of the 2022 inductees can be viewed on the KCA Youtube and Facebook pages.   Applications are now being taken for the 2023 KCA Hall of Fame.  Call the office for more details at 859-278-0899. 

Contact: Carey Brown, KCA

859-278-0899 or cbrown@kycattle.org

Tornado Relief Fund

KCARD is working with the Kentucky Farm Bureau Education Foundation and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture to develop the Kentucky Agriculture Disaster Relief Program. This program will help farmers in Kentucky access needed farm supplies from local farm retailers following the disasters experienced in many areas of Kentucky on December 10 and 11, and on January 1.  Farm retailers in the program will receive funds to offset the costs of such supplies for farmers. 

How does the program work?  The participating retailer will set up an account in their sales system to record sales of eligible supplies to eligible farmers up to $1,500 per farmer.  They will provide records of those sales to the program and receive reimbursement (up to $30,000/store, subject to change) for those sales. 

What supplies are eligible under the program? 

  • Fencing supplies- wire, staples, fence chargers, testers, etc.  
  • T-posts and wooden posts 
  • Tools, such as hammers, rakes, and shovels 
  • Rope and bungee cords 
  • Livestock mineral and mineral feeders 
  • Hay and livestock feed 
  • Work gloves 
  • Chain saws, bar oil, and sharpeners 
  • Hay rings 
  • Gates 
  • Tarps 

What farmers are eligible?  Farmers will have to certify that they have farm property in one of the following counties and experienced farm damage from the storms on December 10 and 11, 2021, and on January 1, 2022:  Barren, Caldwell, Calloway, Christian, Fulton, Graves, Hart, Hickman, Hopkins, Logan, Lyon, Marion, Marshall, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Taylor, and Warren.  Farmers will sign a form at the retailer and provide their contact information. How do I become a Participating Retailer?  Participating retailers must be located in or near the affected area, be locally owned and operated, have the necessary inventory on hand or be able to secure it, and agree to maintain the necessary records for the program.  If you meet these criteria and are interested in the program, you can contact KCARD staff member, Mattea Mitchell at 270-681-0163 or by email at mmitchell@kcard.info.  Our first priority is to get at least one store in or near affected counties.  Additional stores will be added as funds are available.

What Retailers are currently participating? 

Caldwell County

Akridge Farm Supply & Ace Hardware

55 Wyatt Street, Fredonia, KY 42411

(270) 545-3332

Graves County

Falder’s Farm Home and Industry Supply

1428 Cuba Road, Mayfield, KY 42066

(270) 247-7790

Hart County

Hedgepeth Farm Supply

1406 Hedgepeth Road, Canmer, KY 42722

(270) 528-2133

Hopkins County

Calhoun Feed Service/Southern States

515 Nebo Road, Madisonville, KY 42431

(270) 821-5034

Logan County

Southern States – Russellville Cooperative

209 North Bethel Street, Russellville, KY 42276

(270) 726-7678

Marion County

T&H Feed Service

836 West Main Street, Lebanon, KY 40033

(270) 692-2749

Marshall County

Marshall County Co-op

501 Popular Street, Benton, KY 42025

(270) 527-1323

Taylor County

Arnold’s Feed and Seed

599 Arnold Road, Campbellsville, KY 42718

(270) 465-3659

Warren County

Southern States – Bowling Green Cooperative

640 Plum Springs Loop, Bowling Green, KY 42101

(270) 843-1146