Nuisance Weed Spraying Program

The KY Dept. of Agriculture will provide the sprayer and enough chemical for the treatment of 10 acres. KDA representative will demonstrate proper mixing and application techniques. A number of nuisance weeds can be treated under this program. This program is limited to broadleaf weeds. If additional chemical is provided by the participant, an additional 10 acres can be treated. The participant must provide water source, tractor and operator. All chemical products must be labeled and product label will be followed. A maximum of 7 participants per county. This program is designed to target weeds that have a negative impact on agriculture.

If you are interested in participating in this program you will need to complete the online application found at http://www.kyagr.com/consumer/nuisance-weed-spraying-program-application.aspx. Applications can be completed from February 1 to February 28. You can NOT have participated in the last 3 years!

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Dicamba Training

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In October 2017 the EPA approved revised labeling for new formulations of dicamba products which are marketed as Engenia (BASF), Xtendimax (Monsanto), and FeXapan (DuPont).  These new herbicides were developed in conjunction with the release of dicamba-tolerant soybean (Roundup Ready2 Xtend soybean varieties).  All three products, which were first available for applications during the 2017 growing season, are now classified by the EPA as “RESTRICTED USE” pesticides, meaning that either a commercial or private pesticide certification license must be held by individuals who purchase and apply these products.

One of the significant changes with the revised labels is the requirement that applicators must attend a dicamba-specific training session prior to using these herbicide products. Furthermore, the revised labels have more detailed restrictions outlining how the products should be applied including additional record keeping requirements and clarification regarding buffers and what constitutes sensitive areas and crops.  These new label guidelines must be followed when applying preplant, at planting, or postemergence on Dicamba-Tolerant soybean varieties, and with applications on corn, small grains, or other approved sites for applications.

To meet the mandatory dicamba training requirement for applications in Kentucky individuals must attend a training session that has been approved by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.  These training sessions will be presented by University of Kentucky weed scientists or by the registrants who market these dicamba products.  After an individual has completed the training the Kentucky Department of Agriculture will issue a ‘certification’ that will allow the participant to purchase and apply these dicamba products during the 2018 growing season.

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  • Be sure to bring photo id and applicator number.
  • Warren County Extension Office 3132 Nashville Road Bowling Green, KY, 42101

RSVP to Joanna Coles (270) 842-1681

Grow Your Business: Build Your Social Media Presence

Take your business to the next level with our very own program entitled Grow Your Business, Build Your Social Media Presence. This class is designed to be a four-part series where each level builds off the first and hopefully at the end see an impact in your business. For more information please see below.

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See the tentative agenda below:

tentative-agenda-e1514925129861.jpgTo register please complete the registration form and return to our office with your payment. Please make checks payable to Warren County Soil Test.

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Click here for the Social Media Informational Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017-2018 Kentucky Agricultural Economic Situation & Outlook

Contributors: Kenny Burdine, Todd Davis, Jerry Pierce, Will Snell, Tim Woods, (Ag Economics), Jeff Stringer, Bobby Ammerman, Chad Niman, and Billy Thomas (Forestry)

U.S. Agricultural Economy

The U.S. agricultural economy entered 2017 following three straight years of declining income and prices, after an unprecedented/record breaking period of growth during the 2007-2013 period. USDA is projecting 2017 net farm income to total $63.2 billion, up $1.7 billion (+2.7%) relative to 2016, but still off nearly 50% from the record high established in 2013. U.S. ag cash receipts are forecast to be 2.4% higher in 2017 in response to improved livestock sales (+7.6%) versus slightly lower crop receipts (-2%). Production expenses were up slightly (+1.5%) with higher labor, fuel, livestock, and interest costs, but lower feed, seed, fertilizer and chemical expenses. Government farm payments fell to $11.2 billion (-$1.8 billion) as large declines in Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) payments offset higher Price Loss Coverage (PLC) payments. These direct government payments (excludes crop insurance indemnities) accounted for 17.6% of the U.S. net farm income in 2017 vs 21.1% in 2016.

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Despite a lot of political discussion and ag-related concerns about trade this past year, U.S. agricultural exports rebound to $140.5 billion (+8%), in FY 2017, benefiting from a weaker U.S. dollar, an improving global economy, and abundant U.S. supplies. The U.S. exports agricultural commodities/products to nearly 200 nations, but our top three foreign customers – China, Mexico, and Canada, account for nearly one-half of the U.S. ag export value. Undoubtedly the strong export market helped support ag prices in 2017 in the midst of abundant global  supplies. Any future disruption in trade could put additional downward pressure on prices.

Ag lenders remain cautious in the midst of a prolonged downturn in the farm economy. Relatively low interest rates (along with cash purchases) have constrained growth in farm debt levels and also provided support to land values in the midst of the sharp-downturn in the ag. Despite the slumping farm economy, the overall balance sheet for U.S. agriculture as a whole remains relatively strong compared to the farm crisis days of the early 1980s. However, available cash flow/working capital for lower-tiered managers and some highly leveraged/young producers remains a concern for bankers, especially if the current economic conditions lingers.

Without a major supply shock, prices for most ag commodities will likely remain relatively low in 2018 (compared to levels observed during the 2011-2014 period) in response to abundant global grain supplies, growing meat supplies, and potentially a stronger U.S. dollar.

Politically, agriculture will continue to monitor changes in trade policy, tax, health care, and immigration reform, along with debate over the 2018 farm bill and the increasing concentration among agricultural input suppliers and processors. Food price inflation remained benign in 2017 and is expected to remain below historical levels in 2018 as consumers benefit from intense competition in the grocery sector, abundant ag/food supplies, and continued food marketing efficiencies and innovations.

 Kentucky’s Agricultural Economy

The University of Kentucky’s Department of Agricultural Economics is forecasting that Kentucky ag cash receipts will rebound in 2017 to $5.6 billion, 3.5% higher than last year, but well below the record $6.5 billion in 2014. Improved prices will enable sales growth for most Kentucky livestock enterprises –poultry (+10%), horses (+10%), cattle (+5%), dairy (+12%), and hogs (+11%). Poultry also benefitted from a rebound from avian influenza outbreaks, which constrained growth the past two years. Increased soybean acres and record yields are expected to elevate soybean production to record levels. Potentially record corn yields will help offset lower acres and depressed prices. Kentucky’s tobacco sector rebounded from a poor crop in 2016, with sales expected to once again exceed $300 million.

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Poultry remained Kentucky’s number one ag enterprise, accounting for 20% of projected 2017 sales, followed by equine (18%), soybeans (15%), cattle (14%) and corn (13%). For 2018, Kentucky ag cash receipts are expected to be relatively flat ($5.7 billion) with modest gains in poultry, horses, and soybeans, offsetting expected losses in tobacco, corn, and cattle. Look for continued growing demand for local produce/meats, nursery items, and value-added agriculture.

Kentucky net farm income has followed national trends, falling to $1 billion in 2016 compared to averaging $2.1 billion over the 2013-2015 period. Average net farmincome for farms participating in Kentucky’s Farm Business Management (KFBM) program declined to around $100,000 in 2015 and 2016, down from record highs exceeding $400,000 during 2011-2013, and compared to a ten year average of $283,000. Preliminary indications reveal that KFBM average net farm income will improve modestly in 2017 due primarily to higher crop yields, improved livestock prices, and stable input prices.

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Commodity Spotlights (2017-2018)

 

Beef Cattle

  • Calf prices rallied from fall 2016 levels and are roughly $30 per cwt higher than one year
  • Growth in the beef cow herd still ongoing, but has likely
  • Increases in production for all major meats will pressure beef (and cattle) prices in
  • Backgrounding/stocker operations should be opportunistic on placement and aggressive with price risk management.

Poultry

  • Wholesale broiler prices are up from 2016
  • Sector largely back on track following avian influenza outbreaks in recent
  • Production likely to increase another 2% nationally in 2018, with continued growth in Kentucky.

Hogs

  • Kentucky inventory continues to grow, breeding herd up 7% in 2017.
  • Eastern Corn belt hog prices to average $7 per cwt carcass basis higher in 2017.
  • Sizeable production increase likely at national level for 2018, prices unlikely to hold at 2017 levels.

Equine

  • Equine market has generally been steady since recovering from the global recession.
  • Signs point to strength in 2017 –Keeneland yearling sale up 13%, Fasig Tipton yearling and breeding sale up as well.
  • Equine likely to gross nearly $1 billion in Kentucky farm receipts for 2017, with modest growth in 2018.

Dairy

  • Farm level milk prices increased by more than $1 per cwt in 2017, with lower feed and hay prices leading to improved margins.
  • 2017 was a better year than 2016, but certainly not a good year for dairy producers.
  • Kentucky dairy cow numbers continue to decline.
  • Increase in S. cow numbers and milk per cow suggest another production increase and consequently lower farm prices in 2018.

Corn

  • U.S. corn harvested area reduced by 3.6 million acres in 2017 to 83.1 million acres. A record U.S. yield of 175.4 bu./acre produced the 2nd largest crop of 14.6 billion bushels.
  • Carryout expected to increase to 5 billion bushels, which is the largest quantity since 1987. The stocks-use ratio in 1987 was 55% but is 17% in 2017 because of strong use.
  • The 2017 S. Marketing Year Average Farm Price projected at $3.20/bushel, which is only 5% above the 2006 U.S. MYA price.

Soybeans

  • U.S. soybean planted area increased by 6.8 million acres in 2017 to 90.2 million acres. The 2nd largest U.S. yield of 52.5 bu./acre produced a record crop of 4.4 billion bushels.
  • Carryout expected to increase to 425 million bushels, which is the largest quantity since The stocks-use ratio in 2006 was 19% but is 9.8% in 2017 because of strong use.
  • The 2017 S. Marketing Year Average Farm Price projected at $9.30/bushel which is 45% above the 2006 U.S. MYA price.

Wheat

  • Wheat harvested area reduced by 3 million acres in 2017 to 37.6 million acres. The 2017 yield was also reduced 6.4 bu./acre from last year to 46.3 bu./acre. The 2017 wheat crop is 568 million bushels smaller than last year to 1.7 billion bushels.
  • Carryout expected to decrease by 246 million bushels to 936 million The stocks-use ratio in 2017 is 43.8%, and is below 50% for the first time since 2014.
  • War of attrition on supply side is reducing stocks – not strong growth in
  • The 2017 S. Marketing Year Average Farm Price projected at $4.60/bushel, which is $0.71/bu. higher than last year. However, the 2017 U.S. MYA price is only 8% above the 2006 U.S. MYA price.

Tobacco

  • Global burley supply and demand appears more balanced entering the 2017 marketing season, primarily in response to a 30% reduction in world burley production over the past three years.
  • S. burley demand remains soft with exports down nearly 30% since 2015, domestic cigarette production down 8% so far this year, and imports currently accounting for nearly 2/3 of use by domestic manufacturers.
  • A better quality crop and improved supply/demand balances should result in leaf prices being stable to slightly higher, boosting the value of Kentucky’s tobacco crop to around $350 million in 2017 compared to a post-buyout low of $283 million in 2016.
  • Anticipated ample burley supplies and softening demand will likely reduce U.S. burley contracts in 2018, with modest growth in snuff consumption enabling dark contracts to remain relatively stable.

Fruits, Vegetables and Greenhouse

  • Markets were generally stronger for produce in Kentucky in 2017 as hurricane effects substantially elevated prices for late summer and fall crops.
  • Market signals typically tied to nursery production and services (home improvement market, housing starts) have indicated steady recovery from the most recent recession.
  • Accelerating local food movement and demand for value added products provides additional opportunities for growth, but labor uncertainties remain a major concern potentially constraining future growth.

Forestry

  • Overall forestry sector increased to an estimated $14.5 billion in total economic contribution to Kentucky in 2017 with primary industries including sawmilling showing the largest increase of over 14% from 2016.
  • Exports and high domestic demand for white oak and tie logs will remain strong in 2018 pushing overall timber prices up.
  • Pulpwood markets still sluggish but potential re-opening of Wickliffe pulp and paper plant may positively affect markets in Western Kentucky.

 

Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training

Are you a commercial pesticide applicator needing some continuing education units? We are offering 2 days of pesticide education that will help.

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Discover Winter Squash!

For those of us who love the taste and texture of summer squash have no fear! Fall harvest squash varieties are now available and the nutrients and health benefits that these vegetables provide far outweigh their summer cousins!

Kristin Hildabrand, Warren County Extension Agent for Horticulture Education, shares information with Laura Rogers on Mid-Day Live about what varieties of winter squash are available seasonally at Kentucky Farmers’ Markets. Shop local with the Bowling Green’s Original Farmers MarketCommunity Farmers Market Bowling Green, and SoKY Marketplace to find several varieties of winter squash. For more information about winter squash, contact the Warren County Extension Service at (270) 842-1681.

Discover Winter Squash on WBKO 13

Discover the many varieties of winter squash found available seasonally at local farmers markets

 

Best Bean Buyer App


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Soybean Delivery App released in time for harvest

Jordan Shockley explains the technology and guides the user through customization in a short, easy-to-follow YouTube video.

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Princeton, Ky.The Kentucky Soybean Board partnered with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment to develop an app to help soybean producers accurately calculate and compare the price offered by elevators, with consideration to delivery costs and high-moisture penalties for harvested grain.

The app, named Best Bean Buyer, was developed by UK agricultural economist Jordan Shockley and Joe Dvorak, Sam McNeill and Ricky Mason, all in the UK Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering,  using checkoff dollars invested by the Kentucky Soybean Board to provide value and a competitive advantage for Kentucky’s producers.

While increased on-farm storage has decreased the amount of beans that some farmers directly deliver to the elevator, farmers face a reduction in price paid at the elevator for beans sold with high moisture content. Storing the crop to lessen the moisture content is an expensive proposition, though. Farmers have to truck the grain to their on-farm storage bins, load it into the bins, then load the grain back into trucks and haul it to the elevator. This process results in extra fuel costs and additional labor.

Not all farmers have on-farm storage, and this app may very well be the tool that helps them determine their profit margin by calculating transportation costs to various elevators. With high moisture content grain that is trucked straight to the elevator from the field, the moisture discount can make a significant difference in profit by the load and for the crop year.

This free app, available now on both the Apple and Android platforms, calculates in real-time the comparative prices that a producer can expect to receive from different elevators based on grain moisture and costs to haul it to each elevator. While the inputs affecting transportation and moisture discounts may be complex, this app helps producers eliminate the unnecessary cost of delivering to an elevator that will result in a smaller net profit.

It relies on five important features of mobile devices: mobility and availability, connectivity and real-time information, computational power, sensors and individual customization.

The mobility and availability of these devices means that the producer can use this service in the field. Internet connectivity means that the app can easily request the driving distance between a location and every elevator under consideration. This same connectivity provides the mechanism for farmers to enter current prices for each elevator. The computational power of these devices is used to evaluate the complicated equations that govern grain drying so that comparisons between different elevators are possible. The location sensors on a device are used to determine current field location if the producer is using the app in the harvested field. The app can also store information such as individual producer costs for grain transportation.

The app does require some set-up and customization to make it fully functional. Shockley developed a short YouTube tutorial to help producers get the app set up and ready to use. It may be found at https://youtu.be/2KvGAy-B5LE.

Contact:

Jordan Shockley, jordan.shockley@uky.edu, 859-218-4391; Rae Wagoner, rwagoner@kysoy.org, 270-365-7214

Prussic Acid Poisoning

prussic acid poisoning

Grazing certain forages and weeds can bring the threat of prussic acid poisoning to livestock. If caution is used, this threat can be greatly reduced. Plants such as sorghum, sudangrass, sorghum-sudan hybrids, Johnsongrass, wild cherry and others can contain cyanide-producing compounds. After a frost or during a drought it is important to use extreme caution and it is advised to keep livestock off these pastures for up to three days after a killing frost. If soils that are deficient in phosphorus and potassium are applied with high levels of nitrogen, the levels of prussic acid may increase. Leaves, new shoots, and tillers have higher levels of prussic acid.

 

If large amounts of prussic acid are consumed, the compound interferes with oxygen utilization and livestock can die from respiratory paralysis. Symptoms appear quickly after forage is consumed. These symptoms may include cherry red colored blood, staggering, labored breathing, spasms, foaming at the mouth, falling, thrashing, severe convulsions, and death. Immediate treatment by a veterinarian is needed to save livestock suffering from prussic acid poisoning.

 

When cut for hay, prussic acid content decreases significantly during the curing process. A fair amount of this poison escapes as gas during fermentation when used for silage. Although the risk decreases, it is still important to be cautious when feeding forages with possible high prussic acid content.

 

The risk of prussic acid poisoning this season can be reduced by following these practices:

  • Wait 10-14 days after non-killing frost with no additional frost action before grazing.
  • Do not graze after a killing frost until plant material is dry (the toxin usually dissipates within 72 hours.)
  • Do not graze at night when frost is likely. High levels of toxins are produced within hours after frost occurs.
  • Delay feeding silage for six to eight weeks following ensiling.

Black Walnut Hullers

FORFS17-16 Selling Blk Walnuts

Kentucky Grazing Conference

Register Now for the Kentucky Grazing Conference: Pasture Management to Control Weeds and Improve Production

The 2017 Kentucky Grazing Conference will focus on pasture management to control weeds and improve  pasture production and will be held: October 17th in Lexington and October 18th in Hopkinsville. The Keynote speaker is Kathy Voth,  who has presented nationally on using grazing to control weeds and is a founding partner and editor of the popular online newsletter “On Pasture.”

Other speakers will discuss management and chemical options to control weeds including: Dr. Chris Teutsch, UK; Dr. Scott Flynn, DOW; Dr. Greg Brann, NRCS; Dr. Michael Flessner, VT; and Bill Payne, retired dairyman. The popular KFGC Forage Spokesperson contest will be held at the Lexington location. Early registration is $40 and ends October 4 or you may choose the value option of conference registration plus a one year KFGC membership for $50. KY Forage and Grassland Council membership is normally $25. Early registration ends October 4th. Go to the UK forage website and click on “Grazing Conference Tab” to register (www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage) or for full program. Exhibitor and sponsorship opportunities are also available.

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